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November 12, 2020

VIRTUAL BUS TOUR EXPLORES UNITED WAY OF GREATER CINCINNATI’S WORK IN EARLY EDUCATION

Virtual Bus Tour - November 18 

Tour includes look at COVID-19’s impact  

United Way of Greater Cincinnati’s two-decade focus on improving the region’s early education system, as well as how that system is adapting during COVID-19, will be the subject of the organization’s next virtual bus tour at on Nov. 18

Participants will buckle up and learn how United Way helps more children show up to kindergarten prepared to learn. Themed “How United Way Invests in Early Education,” the tour exposes guests to a diversity of early education programs, including center-based care, home visiting and school-based efforts. They’ll visit Clermont and Brown County to learn how United Way supports a strong system of care in the region and how early education services are critical in helping families build strong financial foundations and thrive. 

Participants will also see how child care providers adapted their operations to provide services to children and families during COVID-19. The child care industry was hit particularly hard during the pandemic and is still struggling. Many closed and others ed to help emergency responders with child care needs. 

The tour starts at 6 p.m. Nov. 18. Virtual bus tours offer the public the opportunity to see first-hand – without leaving their seat -- the impact of United Way investments in Greater Cincinnati. Participants experience how services are provided, hear from non-profit partners and learn more about the community solutions United Way leads.  

“Much of our modern work on early childhood education started more than 20 years ago with educating the community about the importance of early childhood brain development and the need for public investment in early care and education,” said Moira Weir, president and CEO of United Way of Greater Cincinnati. “For 20 years, we have fought for systemic change by financially supporting agencies that do great work, convening partners and resources, advocating for policies and programming, and educating people about available resources. We achieve greater results than any one agency can achieve on its own.” 

Examples:

  • Implementing State Quality Rating Systems in both Ohio and Kentucky empowering parents to make choices about sending their children to quality child care   
  • Changing standards for state funding for home visitation programs to more closely align with our local best-in-practice Every Child Succeeds
  • Working with child cares to implement common assessments of student progress to guide teaching practices
  • • Leading the charge for the Cincinnati Preschool Promise, which provides public funding for Cincinnati families to make quality preschool more affordable and accessible 

Register for the 6 p.m. Nov. 18 Zoom tour

 

United Way is in the midst of raising $50 million to help meet increasing community needs because of COVID19. To donate to United Way’s community-wide effort, visit uwgc.org/united.  

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